Thursday, April 28, 2011

Useful Lists for Social Entrepreneurs


THE MODELS THAT WORK

The question of how to scale up a business has always been a tough one for social entrepreneurs. While many articles will emphasize that the question of achieving scale is a complicated one that requires careful consideration of the unique factors of your business and your communities, here's one that offers 5 models that have worked for many organizations along with practical examples of each one.

1. Hub and Spoke Model employed by many microfinance institutions (MFIs).
2. Piggyback Model employed by Gramin Suvidha Kendra and ColaLife.
3. Local Entrepreneurs Model employed by the Grameen Foundation and Greenlight Planet.
4. Market Linkage Model by Under employed by the Mango Tree and Zameen Organic.
5. Local Centers Model employed by Onergy.

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BEST SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP BOOKS

Ned.Com is a global online co-working space for early stage social entrepreneurs and collaborative social ventures. Under its Social Entrepreneurship section, it has a list of the "Top 28 Must Read Books for Social Entrepreneurs" which contains many of my personal favorites (Banker to the Poor by Muhammad Yunus, The Blue Sweater by Jacquline Novograts, How to Change the World by David Bornstein ) and titles on my personal to-read list (Creating a World Without Poverty by Muhammad Yunus, Three Cups of Tea by Greg Mortenson and Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid by CK Prahalad). That tells me their other recommendations may be worth looking into. To access the full list, click here.



CALENDAR OF 2011 NONPROFIT AND SOCIAL CHANGE CONFERENCES

While not really a social entrepreneurship-focused list of conferences, it's still worth checking out because it does tackle a lot of topics useful for both nonprofits and social enterprises. Access the calendar here.





130 WAYS TO FUND YOUR SOCIAL VENTURE
A very extensive list of fellowships, grant giving bodies, crowdfunding platforms, angel and venture capital firms, networking conferences, do-good banks and loan providers. Most of these are US-based, though. But still worth a look since many of them are interested in Asia. To access the full list, click here.

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